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crunkmoose
Netflx n chilli
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August 1 2011 7:48 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by: Sharplimbed

Originally posted by: Dickscraper

oh hey they found a ufo on the bottom of the ocean today


click here for link



And it certainly can't be a manmade object because I'd would assume that any experimental vehicle woud have been retrieved by now by the US or Russian navies.



...



Its the undersea lovechild of the Kursk and the Thresher.
Rats in the walls
crush, kill, destr
1,166 Posts
32/M/NY


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August 1 2011 7:58 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
I think a lot of religious people may not want to accept the possibility that life may not only exist elsewhere, but may exist wherever there is liquid water, making it much more common in the universe than anyone previously thought, as water, liquid or as ice is one of the most common compounds. It may not be complex, it may only be microorganisms or microplankton, but if it's alive, it would destroy their sense of uniqueness in the eyes of their God. But it took 1,500 years for them to accept the fact that the sun and not the earth was in the center of the solar system, so this step might not be an easy one either.

Ironically, the Catholic Church may be taking the lead among denominations on this point:


click here for link
tom.
^__^
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August 1 2011 9:04 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
well i think that's a completely bigotted, yet common point of view on this site.
Rats in the walls
crush, kill, destr
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August 1 2011 9:46 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
No, bigots are people who believe in their own elevated uniqueness and superiority over others, over other people, and over other forms of life. From the first book of the the three major religions, Adam is given dominion over all other forms of life. The idea that man is the crown of creation is the ultimate bigotry of all. And the very idea of a "chosen people" is one of the earliest written expressions of racial bigotry to be found.

But that is also a common point of view in the world, perhaps the most common even today. In the place of knowledge and understanding, billions of people still cling to religion to justify their arrogance and condescension, and the actions which these engender.
Rats in the walls
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August 1 2011 9:52 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
So the possibility that there may be other forms of life in the universe throws that entire imaginary hierarchy into question, and that must scare the living shit out of them.
Rats in the walls
crush, kill, destr
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August 1 2011 9:54 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by: crunkmoose

Originally posted by: Sharplimbed

Originally posted by: Dickscraper

oh hey they found a ufo on the bottom of the ocean today


click here for link



And it certainly can't be a manmade object because I'd would assume that any experimental vehicle woud have been retrieved by now by the US or Russian navies.



...



Its the undersea lovechild of the Kursk and the Thresher.





May not be far off: the Soviets did a lot of underwater weapons testing during the cold war.
Tim E. Husk
slavar som djur
19,086 Posts
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August 1 2011 9:57 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by: tom.

well i think that's a completely bigotted, yet common point of view on this site.



Bigoted, how? Beliefs don't deserve respect simply because they exist.
Tim E. Husk
slavar som djur
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August 1 2011 10:27 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Let me rephrase that in a less belligerent manner - it is hardly a secret that the average Christian has the view that man is privileged. Conversely, it is hardly a secret that the average atheist, agnostic, or science-friendly 'other' interprets the probability of life on other planets toward the favorable side. These aren't equal points, however, and it is silly to pretend like everyone has an objective stance on the issue. No matter what the truth is - and all we can go on now ARE numbers - the numbers that support a very small chance of life producing life are favorable. For example, if 1 out of 1 billion stars contain a planet capable of supporting life, there are more than 1 billion planets capable of supporting life. Perhaps VERY MUCH more. If a very small portion of those actually DO support life, we are still left with a large number. That is math (and of course physics.)

All other arguments about how incredible life seems and how complex it all must be are not on equal footing from a scientific perspective. If we are going to use another yardstick, that's fine, but let's not mix the two.
Tim E. Husk
slavar som djur
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August 1 2011 10:29 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
I should also point out that this site is not a microcosm of average society - America at large is far more Christian than the populations of various subcultures (that aren't explicitly religious.)
Tim E. Husk
slavar som djur
19,086 Posts
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August 1 2011 10:30 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
I should also point out that I'm drunk. G'night.
Guenhwyvar.
murfin&durfin
515 Posts
27/F/PA


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August 2 2011 5:31 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
read these

ive been balls deep in this stuff lately




G uNiT UgLy
g@unit.cum
3,225 Posts
31/M/PA


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August 2 2011 3:19 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by: sleepypanda

read these

ive been balls deep in this stuff lately

.









no offense, but that book is kind of retarded. and it's 40 years old and we've learned a lot about astrophysics since 1968.




also, all it basically says is:





Originally posted by: Wesley Gibson

Originally posted by: squanto

Originally posted by: Max Schreck


Rats in the walls
crush, kill, destr
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November 24 2011 1:44 PM   QuickQuote Quote  



23 November 2011


Most liveable alien worlds ranked

Scientists have outlined which moons and planets are most likely to harbour extra-terrestrial life.

Among the most habitable alien worlds were Saturn's moon Titan and the exoplanet Gliese 581g - thought to reside some 20.5 light-years away in the constellation Libra.

The international team devised two rating systems to assess the probability of hosting alien life.

They have published their results in the journal Astrobiology.

In their paper, the authors propose two different indices: an Earth Similarity Index (ESI) and a Planetary Habitability Index (PHI).

"The first question is whether Earth-like conditions can be found on other worlds, since we know empirically that those conditions could harbour life," said co-author Dr Dirk Schulze-Makuch from Washington State University, US.

"The second question is whether conditions exist on exoplanets that suggest the possibility of other forms of life, whether known to us or not."

As the name suggests, the ESI rates planets and moons on how Earth-like they are, taking into account such factors as size, density and distance from the parent star.

The PHI looks at a different set of factors, such as whether the world has a rocky or frozen surface, whether it has an atmosphere or a magnetic field.

It also considers the energy available to any organisms, either through light from a parent star or via a process called tidal flexing, in which gravitational interactions with another object can heat a planet or moon internally.

And finally, the PHI takes into account chemistry - such as whether organic compounds are present - and whether liquid solvents might be available for vital chemical reactions.

The maximum value for the Earth Similarity Index was 1.00 - for Earth, unsurprisingly. The highest scores beyond our solar system were for Gliese 581g (whose existence is doubted by some astronomers), with 0.89, and another exoplanet orbiting the same star - Gliese 581d, with an ESI value of 0.74.

The Gliese 581 system has been well studied by astronomers and comprises four - possibly five - planets orbiting a red dwarf star.

HD 69830 d, a Neptune-sized exoplanet orbiting a different star in the constellation Puppis, also scored highly (0.60). It is thought to lie in the so-called Goldilocks Zone - the region around its parent star where surface temperatures are neither too hot nor too cold for life.

The Planet Habitability Index produced different results. The top finisher here was Saturn's moon Titan, which scored 0.64, followed by Mars (0.59) and Jupiter's moon Europa (0.47), which is thought to host a subsurface water ocean heated by tidal flexing.

Future telescopes may even be able to detect so-called biomarkers in the light emitted by distant planets, such as the presence of chlorophyll, a key pigment in plants.
Guenhwyvar.
murfin&durfin
515 Posts
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November 24 2011 3:34 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
hancocks book is more factual if you want actual proof. but as far as an entertaining read, chariots is a little better. even if you think the book is complete bullshit its still fun to read and think about.
mrdtb123
crack skat
1,880 Posts
28/M/SC


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November 24 2011 10:28 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Space
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